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Behind the Scenes: Brooklyn AC with Vacancy Sensor

Posted by LUX LED Lighting on

Our first light with a vacancy sensor launched this past June, as part of a special project for the University of Washington's Hans Rosling Center for Population Health.

About the Light & Vacancy Sensor
The Brooklyn AC with Vacancy Sensor is visually similar to the popular Brooklyn AC LED Task Light, with the addition of a vacancy sensor on the front of the base. Once the light is turned on, the sensor begins a 15-minute timer every time infrared is not sensed. After 15 minutes of vacancy, the light automatically shuts off. To reactivate, the light needs to be manually turned on again by using the touch-activated power button. The Vacancy Sensor provides the same automatic shutoff of an occupancy sensor, but requires a manual tap to reactivate, improving the overall energy efficiency of the light and reducing accidental reactivation which can be frustrating and distracting, particularly in shared workspaces or open floor plans.

LUX LED Lighting Brooklyn AC with Vacancy Sensor Workspace

Concept Origins
LUX received an inquiry from The Miller Hull Partnership, the lead design and architecture firm working on the new Hans Rosling Center for Population Health at the University of Washington, about a task light that could have a vacancy sensor added. The design team, focused on the Brooklyn AC LED Task Light due to its many added features (2 universal AC outlets, 2 USB charging ports, and integrated phone stand) but requested the Vacancy Sensor to be added as a customization for an open workplace environment.

More Efficient Workspaces
The Brooklyn AC with Vacancy Sensor will be used at workstations throughout the Hans Rosling Center for Public Health by three main groups: the Department of Global Health, the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation and portions of the School of Public Health. Since the Brooklyn AC with Vacancy Sensor will be used in many collaborative, open spaces, the light will be more energy efficient than one with an occupancy sensor. Once the light automatically turns off, it will stay off until the user turns it on manually. This is in line with the Hans Rosling Center for Population Health’s sustainability goals.

Brooklyn AC with Vacancy Sensor on workstation at Hans Rosling Center for Population Health

About the Hans Rosling Center for Population Health
According to the University of Washington, the Hans Rosling Center for Population Health broke ground in the summer of 2018 and “will serve as a catalyst for the UW’s Population Health Initiative, set to advance the health—and lives—of people around the world.” The facility will also provide central gathering spaces for faculty, students, staff, partners, and visitors from a wide range of disciplines across campus, the region, the nation, and the world to address important global health concerns.

How to Buy
The Brooklyn AC with Vacancy Sensor will initially be offered in Brushed Aluminum finish and is in-stock and ready to ship from the LUX warehouse in CA. To place an order or learn more, view the product page, or contact the LUX LED Lighting Sales Team at sales@luxledlights.com or 805.324.6778.

LUX LED Lighting Brooklyn AC with Vacancy SensorLUX LED Lighting Brooklyn AC with Vacancy Sensor


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